parting shot: st. clair

St. Clair was a neighborhood placed high atop one of Pittsburgh’s south hills. The past tense is appropriate here because little remains within the borders of this isolated patch of land overlooking the Monongahela. The neighborhood used to be home to St. Clair Village, a public housing project with 680 apartments that was built in the 1950s. St. Clair Village is completely abandoned now; demolition crews were tearing down long brick buildings as I pulled up on my bike.

 

St. Clair is an example of urban planning gone wrong, but unfortunately, it’s not a unique example. There are hundreds of St. Clair Villages around the country, places where the underserved are sent to become further marginalized. To be sure, I don’t mean to suggest that places like St. Clair are borne out of a mean-spirited intent to exclude, but geographically isolated housing projects have proven time and again to be misguided. Geographical isolation often equals economic and social isolation; does it make any sense to locate 680 of the city’s poorest families, many without their own transportation, at the top of a steep hill, with only one bus route and one crumbling sidewalk connecting them to the grocery store three miles away?

 

According to an article that appeared in the Tribune last summer, the decision to tear down the project was based on “perceptions of violence and crime and a dwindling population.” Painted on the side of an old recreational center, a mural featured tombstones marked with the names of sixteen homicide victims from St. Clair, an alarming number of deaths for such a small area. St. Clair Village, however, wasn’t always known for violence and crime. The same Tribune article mentioned that early residents of the community remembered it “like at a kibbutz, where you’re self-sustaining, and you’re so close together, you’re more like brothers and sisters.” There was a bakery, a grocery, and a clothing store. Looking at the ruins that exist there now, it’s hard to imagine where any of those neighborhood conveniences might have stood.

 

While taking some pictures around St. Clair Village, I was asked to leave by the foreman of the demolition crew. I told him I was just taking a few photos and wouldn’t disrupt anything but he insisted that I be on my way. “What are you even taking pictures for?” he asked me. I wanted to tell him that I was documenting every neighborhood in Pittsburgh and St. Clair was next on my list. But in a strange way the foreman had a point; there was no longer a neighborhood for me to photograph, just the sad remnants of one. “I promise you there’s nothing to see up here,” he said, and I hated to admit that he was right.

 

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6 Responses to parting shot: st. clair

  1. Jabbar says:

    I lived in St.Clair, my whole life and even though the project sappose to be a steppin stone. it’s still home, it’s still where i was raised and for how they just came out of nowhere and demolish things is is painfull!!
    But we going to keep hope that one day they put something back up there. IF NOT WE WILL BUY EVERY HOUSE IN MOUNT OLIVER!!

  2. Leonard Stefanick says:

    Sad to say you haven’t a clue about St. Clair Village and what it was. You only see what it became. Like many others areas in Pittsburgh, when people who cared about their homes, yards and even other tennants moved away and replaced with people who can care less about anything other than making it from day to day, what would you expect to happen? “”St. Clair is an example of urban planning gone wrong, but unfortunately, it’s not a unique example. There are hundreds of St. Clair Villages around the country, places where the underserved are sent to become further marginalized. To be sure, I don’t mean to suggest that places like St. Clair are borne out of a mean-spirited intent to exclude, but geographically isolated housing projects have proven time and again to be misguided. Geographical isolation often equals economic and social isolation; does it make any sense to locate 680 of the city’s poorest families, many without their own transportation, at the top of a steep hill, with only one bus route and one crumbling sidewalk connecting them to the grocery store three miles away?””

    • Leonard Stefanick says:

      Knock me over with a feather!!!!! Someone seems to have the same name as me as I did not write this!!!!!!! I do remember typing something about St. Clair and it was similar to the first few lines. When it starts “St. Clair is an example” is where it ends. After that, the write-up is all out in left field, hasn’t a clue about St. Clair and what it was. Truly, it falls under “FAKE NEWS” Just someone writing about something they have no idea about, and trying to put their own spin on what and why it was eventually torn down. Pressed for time now but I will come back and add to this. I lived there from 1960 to 1967, went to Knoxville and then Carrick. The real Leonard Stefanick, formally from 270 Bonifay and then 241 Bonifay. If you lived in St. Clair, you know which is the apartment and which is the house. Len

  3. Kathy says:

    I was born in 1956 in St. Clair Village and moved to Carrick 6 years later. I long to hear stories about St. Clair Village. I only remember bits and pieces of it. It is such a shame what became of St. Clair, from my older brothers and sisters it was a nice community back in the day. if anyone has any pictures of St. Clair, I would love to see them. I pass by St. Clair Village 5 days a week and long to hear about it during the 50’s if anyone has any information. thank you. Kathy

    • KATE NATH says:

      Sorry, Kathy,my only ‘tale’ ….I was a Visiting Nurse back in the 80s — when we needed to see a patient in St Clair Village we were Mandated to have a Pgh Police Escort us … the ONLY neighborhood in the Burgh where this was the Rule. I only learned Now that St Clair housing is No More!

  4. Garland says:

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